Incredible Years: Teachers

Classroom Social Skills Dinosaur Program – Strengthening Social and Emotional Competence in Young Children – The Foundation for Early School Readiness and Success: Incredible Years Classroom Social Skills and Problem Solving Curriculum.

The ability of young children to manage their emotions and behaviors and to make meaningful friendships is an important prerequisite for school readiness and academic success. Socially competent children are also more academically successful and poor social skills are a strong predictor of academic failure. This article describes The Incredible Years Dinosaur Social Skills and Problem Solving Child Training program, which teaches skills such as emotional literacy, empathy or perspective taking, friendship and communication skills, anger management, interpersonal problem solving, and how to be successful at school. The program was first evaluated as a small group treatment program for young children who were diagnosed with Oppositional Defiant and Conduct Disorders. More recently the program has been adapted for use by preschool and elementary teachers as a prevention curriculum designed to increase the social, emotional, and academic competence, and decrease problem behaviors of all children in the classroom. The content, methods, and teaching processes of this classroom curriculum are discussed.

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Fostering Social and Emotional Competence: Implementing Dina Dinosaur?s Social Skills and Problem Solving Curriculum in Inclusive Early Childhood Programs


Christopher is a very active, outspoken 4 year old. He frequently engages in aggressive behavior and verbal outbursts, and to outside observers he looks angry most of the time…

This article describes an evidence-based intervention that was designed to increase children?s social and emotional competence, decrease problem behaviors, and increase academic competence. The Incredible Years Dinosaur School Social Skills and Problem Solving curriculum (Webster- Stratton, 1990, Webster-Stratton & Reid, 2003) has been shown in two randomized control group trials to decrease aggression and promote social skills in young children (Webster-Stratton & Hammond, 1997; Webster-Stratton, Reid & Hammond, 2001b). Originally designed as a small group treatment for children diagnosed with Oppositional Defiant Disorder or Conduct Disorder, a revention/intervention classroom-based version of this curriculum has recently been evaluated for all children (ages 3-8 years) targeting high-risk populations. Findings from a randomized, control group intervention study in 160 classrooms (including Head Start and kindergarten classes) with 1746 children indicated that classrooms who offered the Dinosaur School program had teachers who were significantly more nurturing and consistent with discipline, focused more on promoting social and emotional behaviors and were less harsh and critical in their interactions with children. Compared with control classrooms, children in intervention classrooms where the Dinosaur Curriculum was delivered were more cooperative with teachers and peers, were observed to do more problem solving and had higher cognitive and school readiness scores (Webster-Stratton & Reid, 2006). Additionally, a pilot study was conducted investigating the effectiveness of this intervention for use with children with special needs, including Autism Spectrum Disorders. Results included increasing the receptive and expressive feeling word vocabulary, increasing appropriate and prosocial responses to interpersonal problem situations, as well as increasing engagement during large group circle times (Joseph & Strain, 2004).

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Impact of Incredible Years on teacher perceptions of parent involvement: A latent transition analysis

Year: in press Bibliography: Thompson, A., Herman, K.C., Stormont, M., Reinke, W.M., & Webster-Stratton, C. (in press). Impact of Incredible Years on teacher perceptions of parent involvement: A latent transition analysis. Journal of School Psychology. [spacer] Abstract The purpose of the present study was to examine the impact of the Incredible Years® Teacher Classroom Management (IY.
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Improving teacher perceptions of parent involvement patterns: Findings from a group randomized trial

Year: in press Bibliography: Herman, K.C., & Reinke, W.M. (in press).  Improving teacher perceptions of parent involvement patterns: Findings from a group randomized trial.  School Psychology Quarterly. [spacer] Abstract For children with the most serious and persistent academic and behavior problems, parent involvement in education, particularly teacher perceptions of involvement, is essential to avert their.
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Incredible Years Time Out Works Because of Quality of Time In

Year: 2016
Bibliography: Webster-Stratton, C.. 2016.  Incredible Years Time Out Works Because of Quality of Time In.  Incredible Years, Inc., Seattle, WA.

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The use of Time Out as a self-regulation calm down strategy for children between the ages of 3 and 9 years old is part of a.
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Taking the Incredible Years Child and Teacher Programmes to scale in Wales

Year: 2017 (in press)
Bibliography: Hutchings, J. & Williams, M.E. (2017 in press). Taking the Incredible Years Child and Teacher Programmes to scale in Wales. Childhood Education, in press.

The content and international evidence for the Incredible Years programmes for children and teachers are described. This is followed by a description.

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The Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program: Outcomes from a Group Randomized Trial

Year: 2016 Bibliography:  Reinke, W.M., Herman, K.C., & Dong, N. (2016). The Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program: Outcomes from a Group Randomized Trial. Manuscript submitted for publication. [spacer] Abstract This group randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluated the efficacy of Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program (IY TCM) on student social behavioral and academic outcomes among.
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