Impact of Incredible Years on teacher perceptions of parent involvement: A latent transition analysis

Year: in press
Bibliography: Thompson, A., Herman, K.C., Stormont, M., Reinke, W.M., & Webster-Stratton, C. (in press). Impact of Incredible Years on teacher perceptions of parent involvement: A latent transition analysis. Journal of School Psychology.

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the impact of the Incredible Years® Teacher Classroom Management (IY TCM) training on teacher perceptions of parental involvement. A cluster randomized design was used to assign 42 classroom teachers to either an IY TCM training (n = 19) or a control condition (n = 23). Teachers rated parental involvement (i.e., bonding with teacher, parental involvement at school) for the families of 805 low income students (IY TCM=504, control=301). A Latent Profile Transition Analysis framework was used to model the effect of IY TCM on teacher perceptions of parental involvement from pre to post test. Four profiles consisting of various patterns of high, medium, and low teacher perceptions of bonding with and involvement of parents emerged. Analyses of teacher profiles at baseline revealed teachers who felt parental involvement and bonding was low were also likely to rate students as having more externalizing behaviors, fewer social competencies, more attention deficit symptoms, and disruptive behaviors towards adults and peers compared to teachers with more adaptive profiles. Further analysis revealed that parents of teachers randomly assigned to IY TCM were more likely to transition to a more adaptive view of parental involvement at follow-up compared to teachers in the control condition. Because teacher perceptions of parental involvement may adversely impact teacher attitudes toward difficult students, findings from the present study support the promise of teacher training as an avenue for conferring protections for struggling students.

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